The Latest From MIT Press: Communism For Kids

by Jodi Giddings on April 18, 2017

The public education complex—from kindergarten through the university system—is generally a cesspool of leftist indoctrination. From forcing social justice on five-year-olds to insisting babies are racist, is it any wonder that an entire generation may be forever lost to liberalism? The latest contribution in said indoctrination is this 112-page nugget from MIT Press—yes, that MIT—a book of tripe entitled Communism For Kids. It’s available on Amazon for just under ten American dollars, ironic given the subject matter. And it’s just as ghoulish as it sounds. Behold:

Photo Credit: Amazon

Nice illustration. Smash the bourgeois, kiddos!

And here’s the book’s description offered by its publisher:

Once upon a time, people yearned to be free of the misery of capitalism. How could their dreams come true? This little book proposes a different kind of communism, one that is true to its ideals and free from authoritarianism. Offering relief for many who have been numbed by Marxist exegesis and given headaches by the earnest pompousness of socialist politics, it presents political theory in the simple terms of a children’s story, accompanied by illustrations of lovable little revolutionaries experiencing their political awakening.

It all unfolds like a story, with jealous princesses, fancy swords, displaced peasants, mean bosses, and tired workers–not to mention a Ouija board, a talking chair, and a big pot called “the state.” Before they know it, readers are learning about the economic history of feudalism, class struggles in capitalism, different ideas of communism, and more. Finally, competition between two factories leads to a crisis that the workers attempt to solve in six different ways (most of them borrowed from historic models of communist or socialist change). Each attempt fails, since true communism is not so easy after all. But it’s also not that hard. At last, the people take everything into their own hands and decide for themselves how to continue. Happy ending? Only the future will tell. With an epilogue that goes deeper into the theoretical issues behind the story, this book is perfect for all ages and all who desire a better world.

Please tell me this is fiction! But let’s move along.

Here’s a sample of one of the book’s blurbs:

Communism for Kids, by Bini Adamczak, is in fact for everyone, an inspired and necessary book especially now, a moment when people feel that we are on the verge of the destruction of the world, and without any new world to hope for, or believe in. Have two hundred years of capitalism brought us freedom? Or just more inequality than has ever been experienced by humans on earth? Global capitalism is not human destiny, it merely is. To think beyond it, with the help of Adamczak’s primer, is to take a first step toward freedom, at least the freedom to imagine other worlds. (Rachel Kushner, author of The Flamethrowers)

Sure. When I think of “communism,” the first thing that comes to mind is “freedom.” Astonishing.

A quick glance through the preview pages finds gems of wisdom like this:

Photo Credit: Amazon (click to enlarge)

Oddly, nowhere in the preview does it include photos of the realities of Communism. Photos like this:

In Mao’s China, dissenters were executed. (Photo Credit: Quora). Additionally, at least 45 million died under Mao Zedong during the Great Famine, one of the worst cases of mass genocide in world history. (Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

…or this:

Lenin’s Soviet Union. Starvation has always been a hallmark of communism. (Photo Credit: Daily Mail)

…or this:

“Shin Dong-hyuk (born 19 November 1982 or 1980 as Shin In Geun) is reputed to be the only known prisoner to have successfully escaped from a “total-control zone” grade internment camp in North Korea. He was the subject of a biography, Escape from Camp 14: One Man’s Remarkable Odyssey From North Korea to Freedom in the West…” (Photo and Quote Credit: Wikipedia)

Meanwhile, most reviewers aren’t buying what MIT is selling. Exhibit A, from JoeQPublic:

Children’s books are written for the naive, of course, but this one was also written BY the naive. While done in a cutes-ey style, the book is idiotic and almost unreadable. Its timing is ironic, given that Venezuela is currently melting down even as the book releases, another country fallen victim to the very economics pushed in this book. And lest we forget, two million people have starved to death in the past decade in North Korea, the world’s last fully Communist state. Many of the dead were children. This ideology has murdered or staved over 60 million people — how about we don’t pass the virus on to the next generation?

And another from someone who says (s)he lived under communism,

I grew up in the communism and believe me, the idea of communism will never works. This idea is based on mass murder. I was a kid and I know what is communism for a kid. My family didn’t do anything against regime, and this is why they was not killed, just imprisoned and abused every day. The police break into our home every week and made a mess and break our stuff – just for fun. And this is communism.

Communism for kid is simply: you have no right to have dreams. No matter what talent you have, you will do what Party order you. You cannot study, you cannot choose…you have to obey.

Indeed.

Warning: Graphic.

Not to worry, though, says its author. Communism For Kids is a different kind of communism. Not the Communism that’s inherently genocidal and intentionally starves its citizens to death and/or imprisons them in labor camps for life where they are tortured and worked until they die. Not Stalin, Castro, Mao, or North Korean “revolutionary” communism, but the communism that will never ever be bastardized by evil-doers. Or something. Just, you know, ignore all the inherent genocide, little tykes. The New and Improved Communism Utopia will provide everything you need, complete with a nice set of rose-colored blinders for when the inevitable round-up of dissenters begins and the food runs out. And the only price we’ll really pay? Just the end of liberty as we know it.

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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

GWB April 18, 2017 at 12:47 pm

It’s available on Amazon for just under ten American dollars

Shouldn’t it be FREE?!? Isn’t this a need for the kiddos?

Nice illustration. Smash the bourgeois, kiddos!

Yeah, I know no one who can figure out what they’re smashing. It looks like …. machinery? So, they’re luddites, too? Or is it saboteurs?

Once upon a time, people yearned to be free of the misery of capitalism.

Said no one. Ever. At least, who understood what “capitalism” is. Or “misery”. (Hint: it was NOT capitalism that enslaved you.)

Have two hundred years of capitalism brought us freedom?

Ummmm, yes?
Though, honestly, it was freedom that allowed capitalism. The real issue is that capitalism allowed a standard of living that let people gaze at their navels and come up with stupid ideologies like communism and have the technical ability to spread their idiotic fantasies to a wide enough gullible audience to do actual harm. So, yeah, capitalism is at fault for that.

Or just more inequality than has ever been experienced by humans on earth?

Why would inequality be such a terrible thing? This is where the lie is! In a moral worldview, it would be suffering that would be the terrible, awful thing. Communism/socialism is all about envy – things improved but not as much for me as for someone else (OMG, Trump!). So, things must be absolutely terrible since I’m not as well off as other people – even though they are so much better for me that I can sit on my butt and watch TV shows about the rich and famous instead of toil endlessly just to put enough calories in my mouth to manage to live another day.

BTW, The People’s Cube did a take on this. (In case anyone doesn’t know, the guy who built and runs that site was a Soviet agitprop artist.)

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Jodi Giddings April 18, 2017 at 1:01 pm

Spot on, GWB. Not to mention this post not only wouldn’t be possible under the brutality of communism, it would get me thrown into a labor camp for the remainder of my life.

Reply

Jodi Giddings April 18, 2017 at 1:04 pm

And that People’s Cube title and post: Perfection.

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