Feminists Throw Hissy Fit Over Victoria’s Secret Rape Panties

by Cassy Fiano on December 14, 2012

Feminists love to describe our culture in completely random, nonsensical ways. From a culture of “oppression” to an imaginary war on women, they keep finding all kinds of ways to make sure that women know how gosh darn bad they’ve got it. Are you a woman who likes your life, is happy, and thinks men respect women? Well, too bad. You clearly are wrong!

The newest description is “rape culture”. Because, you know, in the United States there’s an overwhelming rape culture, or something. And this explains why I constantly have to hear rape jokes and about how it’s totally cool if men rape me, and how if they do, I’ll be the one punished. Oh, wait… that’s not the United States. That’s Saudi Arabia! My bad.

Anyway, a prime example of “rape culture” is Victoria’s Secret, whose panties apparently = rape. Or that rape is ok, anyway. They print slogans like “sure thing” and “unwrap me” on their thongs that women willingly buy! They’re feeding into the rape culture! Clearly, this calls for feminist intervention!

Enter FORCE, who decided to play a little prank. They snuck into Victoria’s Secret stores and planted anti-rape panties next to the oh-so-offensive pro-rape panties.

FORCE explains:

It all started last Monday, when FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture borrowed the company’s trademark image to promote the satirical website pinklovesconsent.com. The site spoofs Victoria’s Secret “PINK” (an official line marketed at college and highschool students) as a way to promote consent and fight rape. Consent is a verbal agreement about how and when people are comfortable having sex. The fake site sports panties reading consent slogans, such as “Ask First” or “No means No.” On the “Then and Now” page, the parody says “Then we loves styles that were all about rape culture. Now we love styles that are all about consent. Catch changes hitting stores this holiday season!”

The organizers of PINK loves CONSENT believe the idea of consent should be as mainstream and common as wearing a condom. Just like pausing to put on a condom prevents STD’s, pausing to check in with your partner prevents unwanted sexual experiences. They say, “We need to create a culture where the sexual empowerment of women is more pervasive than the sexual violation. We want to see the practice of consent show up in the bedroom just as much as ‘V-string’ thongs.”

The panty prank got an overwhelmingly positive response. In two days, this site had over 200,000 hits. The stunt was written up in the Huffington Post, Jezebel, The Daily Beast and BUST to name a few. EVERYONE was talking about it on social media. High school and college aged students blogged and reblogged the story like crazy. International consent enthusiasts tweeted positive declarations about why they #loveconsent. On facebook, VS customers were wishing the consent campaign was real. And during the broadcast of the annual Fashion Show the #victoriassecret hashtag was successfully hi-jacked to promote #loveconsent more than the #vsfashionshow.
Where did this outpouring for consent come from?

What did Jezebel have to say?

Last week, feminist group FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture tried to convince everyone that Victoria’s Secret’s PINK line was launching a line of consent-themed underwear. The company’s legal team nipped their satire advocacy in the bud, so now FORCE is actually placing thongs that say “Ask First” next to real VS panties that say “Unwrap Me” in in over a dozen stores in North America and Europe. They’re calling it “operation panty drop.” They rule.

Hell yeah! How dare Victoria’s Secret make underwear with Christmas puns and sexual innuendo! This clearly encourages RAAAAAPE!

In all seriousness, are the feminazis really this stupid? Are they seriously this unhinged? Someone please explain to me how a woman who willingly buys a thong that says “unwrap me”, willingly wears it, and potentially has sex after wearing it feeds into this mythical rape culture. Because anyone with even an ounce of logic or common sense in their head can see how absolutely ridiculous this is. Besides, is it really the responsibility of Victoria’s Secret to ensure that no one wearing their panties gets raped? They’re just making the merchandise available. Women willingly buy them. Whatever happens after that is not their fault, whether it’s a rape or a woman who goes out and screws fifty guys wearing them.

I guess the thought is this: woman buys panties that say “sure thing”. Her boyfriend/husband/one night stand sees them and his uncontrollable man urges take over — nurtured by our rape culture, of course — and so he rapes her. All because of the evil, evil Victoria’s Secret panties. Without a thong that said “unwrap me”, the woman would never have been raped.

How stupid can you be? Saying that Victoria’s Secret is part of a rape culture is just as dumb as saying that Victoria’s Secret makes women become sluts.

And feminists wonder why women want nothing to do with the movement.

{ 14 comments… read them below or add one }

WayneB December 14, 2012 at 12:25 pm

It’s no different from gun control nuts blaming gun manufacturers for gun crime…

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Dana December 14, 2012 at 2:55 pm

Would an actual rapist be deterred by panties which instructed him to “ask first?” If it is a rape attempt, he was unable to take any invitation from “unwrap me” because the woman in question was more fully dressed, and he couldn’t see it before the beginning of a rape attempt.

Rape is a real and serious problem, but this is the kind of thing which trivializes that problem; it makes the serious seem superficial.

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Dana December 14, 2012 at 2:56 pm

The article reminds me of the “I’d rather go naked than wear fur” campaign. By focusing all of the attention on the naked woman, it trivialized the message PETA was trying to put forth.

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1389AD December 16, 2012 at 3:23 pm

Wearing panties that say “Unwrap me” is a way of giving not only consent, but also encouragement, to one’s husband. Maintaining a good marriage takes a little romance and seduction. Somebody here sure hates heterosexuality, either that, or they hate marriage.

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Beck December 22, 2012 at 9:18 pm

This hoax was to draw attention to the fact that Victoria’s Secret “PINK” line, targeted at girls in college (teens/twenties), is sending the wrong message. Being the top women’s underwear company, of course young ladies are going to be encouraged to follow in the footsteps of women before them and purchase products (especially cute products, with animals prints, flowers and their favorite sports team’s logos) that say things that would encourage promiscuous behavior. Yes, it is not the job of Victoria’s Secret to keep girls from acting like sluts. It is not Victoria’s Secret’s duty to prevent rape. But I think this group was trying to say that maybe fewer acquaintance rape/date rape/group forced sex on college campuses would happen if both young women wearing these underwear (VS, that is) and young men who see this news story and/or the panties (FORCE’s), talk about things and their bodies. This campaign was just promoting communication and trying to inform women that they don’t have to be slutty just because popular underwear says sexy things. VS effects pop culture and their PINK line is targeted at young, single women, not married adults (even though those women wear PINK products as well). They’re not selling their products. They were just trying to get people to talk about the fact that rape happens and with spring break coming up, I think it’s nicely timed. Maybe this will inspire a few girls to not get drunk and pass out with men they don’t know. I don’t think this hoax hurt anyone; it only might’ve helped a few girls feel like it’s okay to be vocal and respect their bodies. You never know.

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Jordan March 13, 2013 at 8:15 pm

so nicely put.

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Jaime March 22, 2013 at 9:36 am

I love how such a thoughtful response will go ignored by most people reading this. You’ve clarified and provided counter-points and yet everyone below you continues to ignore the clear intention of this group’s act.

“In all seriousness, are the feminazis really this stupid? Are they seriously this unhinged? Someone please explain to me how a woman who willingly buys a thong that says “unwrap me”, willingly wears it, and potentially has sex after wearing it feeds into this mythical rape culture.”

In all seriousness, do you actually believe a group of highly educated social activists are intending a literal reaction to this “hoax” or can you understand the implication that young girls are taught and encouraged to sexualize themselves in a variety of ways and maybe raising a discussion about this could give young girls an alternate way to view their bodies–like that maybe they’re not only created for the pleasure and amusement of men?

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Jenny December 23, 2012 at 2:55 pm

hahahha I saw a picture of a pair of “Unwrap me” panties which I found adorable, while I googled after them I came over this article. I totally agree with you, the rape will happen with or without panties which the rapist founds inviting. My first thought was that the scenario will probably be that there will be some comment about the panties… such as “Oh you’re saing no but your underwear are loud and clear telling me yes!”. But hey, regardless there could might as well have been a song on the radio about sex that the rapist could mention as a “argument” (or rather more joke?) uhm… Either way it’s not the clothing’s fault, it’s the rapist fault. By the way I also like the “No means no!” ones, hope they’re for sale somewhere. Peace out feminists.

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Sandra Wilson January 13, 2013 at 4:37 am

I like that panty design, hope I can wear it someday. Thank you sharing!

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Tyler January 17, 2013 at 5:38 pm

The thing the ultra feminists can’t seem to grasp with their consent consent mantra is that is just not how human sexuality usually works. Its kind of hard to visualize a man and a woman back at her place or his place after a date making out and the man asks please may I put my penis in your vagina for a few minutes. Most women would be disgusted, most women don’t want to be asked please may I kiss you either. Women of course do not want to be raped or forced to do things against their will nobody does but many enjoy whats essentially a form of role-play where a man is the aggressor and sort of acts like he is taking what he wants without permission. Obviously if a woman says no I don’t want to do that its a mans responsibility to stop and respect her wishes. Honestly though complainers, this is peoples underwear, presumably guys wouldn’t be seeing them unless a woman is going to be getting undressed around him. Its no surprise that Victoria Secret is making underwear with sexual messages, thats kind of their thing.

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Anne Gable February 3, 2013 at 11:40 am

Please. You want to prevent rape? Stop getting drunk. Get a friend to take you down a shady street at night. Buy some mace. Learn some self defence. Don’t buy sexy underwear with “Ask first” on it.

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Jordan March 13, 2013 at 8:33 pm

Anne,
This is a perfect example of what rape culture actually is. This is an example of ‘victim-blaming’.
Women should be able to get drunk, walk down sidewalks at night, wear whatever they want and still have no more fear for her safety than a man would. The typical argument used in rape culture is claiming that the behavior of the victim was “asking for it”. If a woman gets drunk or dresses a certain way, she is still not asking to get raped and it is not her fault if it happens.
Our culture teaches women to not get raped, instead of teaching men to not rape; thus the term rape culture. This is exactly why society needs feminism.
While a man with intentions to rape a woman would probably still go through with it, regardless of what her panties say, the idea of “sure thing” written on women’s underwear and advertised as a ‘season must-have’ promotes the idea that society is entitled to the access of women’s bodies, permission or not. By introducing the contrary idea, the idea that total consent is necessary in order to access a woman’s body, rape culture is diluted at least a little bit. While the “ask first” underwear may not be a tool to deter men from the act of rape, it encourages young women to take total control of their right to exercise the option of giving consent or not.

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Kit March 15, 2013 at 12:26 pm

Really? So you’re telling me that no woman should ever have to take responsibility for her own behavior? Here’s yet another manifestation of liberal thought: that the world “should” be a certain way. I SHOULD be able to walk in any part of town, at any time of day or night, without being assaulted. Guess what? That’s not how it is. That’s why I don’t go into certain parts of town, and I carry a handgun. I take the responsibility for my own safety by not engaging in behavior that makes me a target. That’s not condoning “rape culture,” that’s just being a smart, independent female.

We’re so busy blaming men for their animalistic ways that we don’t ever turn it around and say hey wait a minute. Why are you putting yourself in irresponsible situations? It’s not a question of “asking for it,” it’s a question of understanding cause and effect relationships. When you punch someone in the face in a bar, you’re probably going to get punched back. Does it make their action correct? Of course not, but you engaged in conduct that facilitated a situation. If you have unprotected sex and get pregnant, did you enable a set of consequences that were preventable? Yes.

Same thing in a lot of these situations. If you go to a bar, get drunk, pick up some guy you know nothing about, take him home or go somewhere with him, and then get raped because at some point between topless and bottomless you decided you want to stop, did you contribute to the situation? Did you put yourself in an unsafe position that made it easier for you to be victimized? Yes, you did. That IN NO WAY absolves the male of responsibility for HIS choice, but there’s plenty of personal responsibility to go around. We are teaching women that regardless of their conduct, regardless of their irresponsibility, and regardless of their actions, no matter what happens to them it’s always a man’s fault. Sorry, but I don’t buy that—and I’m a rape survivor.

Rape is never okay, and I’m the FIRST person to say that. HOWEVER, we need to start teaching women that rape is often preventable. Standing in the middle of the freeway may lead to injury, and even though it’s the driver’s fault for hitting you, it wasn’t exactly bright of you to put yourself in an unsafe situation. Getting raped is not your fault, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t protect yourself and NOT put yourself in situations where it can ever happen.

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Jaime March 22, 2013 at 9:44 am

…And since we know how easily tempted men are, we should encourage women to cover more of themselves. Even a bit of skin at the wrist or a wisp of hair can be enough to arouse the raw sexual desire of a man. It’s just their nature, not their faults! Women should take more responsibility in the way they conduct themselves.

Oh, and of course you shouldn’t walk in a dark alley at night, but you also shouldn’t have to worry that if you get drunk at a high school party like many otherwise good, kind and productive teenagers do, that you will get stripped, carried from house to house, brutally raped and then have it broadcast across social media just to be blamed and continually threatened. Is it okay to say that shouldn’t happen?

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